Subo

Work in Progress.
Inspired by Korean Embroidered Pojagi (subo)
Loom Woven Linen Wrap with Linen Thread Stitching.

Spinning some Organic Cotton

This is the cotton that I handpicked in the Texas Panhandle. This is the start of a custom order for a woven bolt of cloth for a Fashion Designer / Clothing Store.

I went two different times to pick the cotton. I ended up picking about 150 pounds.
The pictures show the progression of turning the cotton into yarn.

Today on the Wooden Loom

A New Handcrafted Throw / Security Blanket. Made with Natural Cotton. The weave is based on an old Scandinavian Pattern. I will only be making three weaving’s of this pattern, and then I will not make it again for the rest of the year.

Yarn Needed

I though that it might good to show an example of the amount of yarn needed for a throw.

I buy my yarn in 3.5 lb cones. Just in yarn for the throws only, I try to keep approx. 21 cones of yarn on stock all the time. For all of my weaving’s, I have about 100 lb natural cotton yarn. For my one of a kind weaving about the same, but in fiber for spinning. Silk from Meghalaya, Belgium Linen, Wild Nettle from the Himalaya, Bast Fiber from Japan and personally handpick Organic Cotton from Lamasa, Texas

Approx. 2.5 lbs of natural cotton yarn is needed to create one loom woven throw.

“What art means to me“

“What art means to me“

by C. Valentine Kirby

I feel within an impulse, perhaps that divine impulse which has moved all races in all ages and in all climes, to record in enduring form the emotions that stir within.

I may model these emotions in clay, carve them in wood, hew them in stone, or forge them in steel. I may weave them in textiles, paint them on canvas or voice them in song: but whichever I do I must harken always to the song of the lark and the melody of the forest and stream and respond to the color of the rose and the structure of the lily, so that my creation may be in accord with God’s laws and the universal laws of order, perfect fitness and harmony.

Moreover, I must make my creation good and honest and true, so that it may be a credit to me and live after I am dead, revealing to others something of the pleasure which I found in its making,

Then will my creation be Art whether I be poet or painter blacksmith or cobbler, for I shall have labored honestly and lovingly in the realization of an ideal.

Today on the loom.


A New Pattern for a set of
Throw / Security Blankets.
Natural Cotton, Grown and Milled in the USA.

This pattern is a variation of a Scandinavian Birds’ Eye. This version is from the early 1800’s.

Tzedakah, Dāna, Gifting

Like all of my Heirloom Weaving, I will weave three each in a 3/2 and 5/2 cotton yarn. Of the three of each set, one is removed to be gifted to a children hospital.
The remaining two will be offered for purchase.

Starting to “Wet Finish” my Weaving’s

For those that want to know what that means, this is it.

Once the threads/yarns have been woven, they are still not considered cloth.
Wet finishing is a process of washing the newly made cloth so that the threads relax and “bloom”.

When I finish weaving a throw, I will cut it off the wooden loom.
Each piece is then hand-washed in hot water with a mild detergent. Then hand rinse and dried in the dryer.

Wet finishing is the final step in making a piece of cloth on a hand loom.
Wet finishing changes the texture and drape of the cloth. The cloth will also have a shrinkage from 10% t0 15%, depending on the pattern weave.

In the picture you can see an example
of what I mean.

In the picture on the left, the two on the bottom are a light and heavy weight throws, cut of the loom. The two above them have been wet finished.
On the right, they are wet finished, but it shows you how the pattern weave can change the texture.

Heirloom

Crafted by hand, my heirlooms are special because of the stories they collect over time. Objects that traveled down the branches of our family tree and ended up in our living rooms.

My heirlooms will represent a beloved person or memory. They add warmth and personality to a home. Not every one of them will have a fantastic history, but will still wrap us up in warm memories.